Colorado’s Energy Industry Supports a Strong Economy

By Kelly J. Brough, President and CEO of the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce

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When we talk about working together in Colorado, the energy industry is often at the top of our list. As the President and CEO of the Denver Metro of Commerce, I see the industry’s unwavering dedication to teamwork every day in their workings with regulators and the business community. The proof is in the pudding—so to speak.

You only have to consider how hard they have worked to produce clean-burning natural gas while upholding some of the most stringent environmental regulations in the country. Or, that they led efforts to avoid costly and potentially economically devastating ballot issues that were proposed last November. Or, how this diverse energy industry works together to deliver on a great economic future for both renewable sources of energy as well as traditional sources of energy.

I’ve seen many companies go above and beyond these regulations—investing in new technology and carrying out best practices, such as traffic reduction or solar panel usage at well sites, to further reduce pollution and limit land disturbance. That can-do, problem-solving attitude serves us well in Colorado. This commitment to excellence and collaboration is paying off.

The Colorado Energy Coalition, a coalition of our affiliate the Metro Denver Economic Development Corporation, released a study about Colorado’s energy industry. That study depicts the impact of the collaboration we saw last year among Colorado’s energy industry. It compares Colorado to the other 49 states in our union and its findings confirm that we are leaders and innovators in this important industry.

Check out our infographic to see why:

CRED_ResourceRich_Colorado

Click here to read the full report.

We’re lucky to live in a place with energy businesses that literally power our state and our country. And, they carry forward some of the core values of our business community: we work together, we solve problems and we think long-term. And as citizens, we’ve stood with them to share our support for those values.

 

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